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Recent purchase of a 3 Skyactiv X Sport GT Technology


nimbuye5

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My Gen 2 just hit 75,000 miles, all but the first five of which I had driven, and its 8th birthday was in March.  With the MOT coming up and £750 worth of warnings on last year's report, I chose to replace it before the MOT instead of waiting until October, when I retire.  I had a budget of £20,000 plus a trade-in, and I was able to get an ex-demo 2.0 Skyactive G with 2,400 miles on it and black 18-inch wheels, a front air dam, side skirts, and a rear roof and under bumper for just the right amount. Because I didn't like the tyre repair kit, I even bought a space-saving wheel, jack, etc.   
It's Very Nice. I've gotten used to the bells and whistles, but the small orchestra is still giving me trouble.

One point for the mods: the personal info choices need to be updated to include the current model details and Soul Red Crystal (46V) as a colour option.

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This is just a clever way of saying that the GT Sport Tech has a tonne of extras compared to the base model of my old Tamura.  The most notable features are a 360-degree camera, radar cruise control, and steering assist (I disabled the latter since it alerted me with alarms and vibrations every time I crossed lanes without signalling (even when merging back in after passing) or approached the white line).

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Those were the days...

Citroen has one, and if you drive on tight rural roads on a frequent basis, it may be dangerous. Turned off on the way back from the dealer, and sometimes turns on on lengthy highway journeys if I remember.

To be honest, 98% of the current driver aid technology is just distracting, yet it is essential for NCAP. The only item that is helpful is the device that scans road signs and sends the speed restriction to the cruise or speed limiter.

I think I like the older vehicles because, as long as you don't drive like a jerk, it lets you get on with it and only intervenes if things go really wrong. They also looked to throw less wobblers.

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2 minutes ago, diablos_carcv5 said:

Those were the days...

Citroen has one, and if you drive on tight rural roads on a frequent basis, it may be dangerous. Turned off on the way back from the dealer, and sometimes turns on on lengthy highway journeys if I remember.

To be honest, 98% of the current driver aid technology is just distracting, yet it is essential for NCAP. The only item that is helpful is the device that scans road signs and sends the speed restriction to the cruise or speed limiter.

I think I like the older vehicles because, as long as you don't drive like a jerk, it lets you get on with it and only intervenes if things go really wrong. They also looked to throw less wobblers.

Indeed.  And I think there's a big irony in all these "safety" gadgets, since they probably lower a car's insurance group and rate, but many of them can be turned off by hand, which makes it pointless to have them.  Note that I'm not telling anyone they're wrong for turning off these features, since I agree that many of them are, at best, a waste of time for anyone who knows how to drive and has common sense.

It's one of the reasons why I now prefer mid- to low-spec cars, as long as they have climate control (I don't care if it's dual zone or not) and ABS. The other reason is that they have better wheels and tyres, which makes the ride more comfortable.  I also agree that because of this, there is a lot less that can go wrong.

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The Gen 4 is a wonderful looking vehicle with a lovely cabin for the money. When the first one was out, I sat in one at the dealer and it made my vehicle seem like it was from the 1980s.

However, it seems to have been constructed with all the bells and whistles in mind. Because you had windows in the Gen 2, you don't need a back camera or a blind spot monitor, but as wonderful as the Gen 4 is, it was obviously created with visibility at the bottom of the priority list.

While it's comforting to imagine that a good driver doesn't require these items, many current automobiles make being a decent driver difficult without blind spot monitoring and other features.

Even on the C3, which is not as low-roofed as the Mazda 3 but does have kicked-up rear windows, a sloping roof, hefty C pillars, a tiny back window, and dark tinted rear glass, a reversing camera is a much better alternative than looking out. Yes, you still look over your shoulder, but your range of vision is almost nonexistent.

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1 minute ago, diablos_carcv5 said:

The Gen 4 is a wonderful looking vehicle with a lovely cabin for the money. When the first one was out, I sat in one at the dealer and it made my vehicle seem like it was from the 1980s.

However, it seems to have been constructed with all the bells and whistles in mind. Because you had windows in the Gen 2, you don't need a back camera or a blind spot monitor, but as wonderful as the Gen 4 is, it was obviously created with visibility at the bottom of the priority list.

While it's comforting to imagine that a good driver doesn't require these items, many current automobiles make being a decent driver difficult without blind spot monitoring and other features.

Even on the C3, which is not as low-roofed as the Mazda 3 but does have kicked-up rear windows, a sloping roof, hefty C pillars, a tiny back window, and dark tinted rear glass, a reversing camera is a much better alternative than looking out. Yes, you still look over your shoulder, but your range of vision is almost nonexistent.

Yes, I believe that utilising the camera is the most convenient choice due to the automatic dimming rearview mirror and the substantially tinted back windows. Although it's simpler to utilise the camera & wing mirrors in low light, I still attempt to reverse park using my wing mirrors & the little vision from the back view mirror.

While seated in the front, it's not an issue; I must say, I don't like the black roof lining.
I don't know how my (adult) daughter will feel about the 340-mile trip to Mallaig in the back seat - I asked her opinion before I bought the car, and she said it was dark, but OK. She has since said it is very dark in the back, and she used to whine that she couldn't see much out of the windows in my Gen 2. She'll be seeing even less in the Gen 4!

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I saw the Gen 4 yesterday and am close to buying.

The automobile is fantastic for the driver but not for passengers. Nice exterior.

The main console's limited buttons make Gen 1 seem lacking. The interior seems sparse since they are all oriented to the in-car screen.

This weekend, I'm considering Metallic Blue.

Only trade in Gen 1 due to deteriorating paint. Hopefully Mazda 3 new models fix this. Otherwise, a nice vehicle.

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1 minute ago, nimbuye5 said:

Yes, I believe that utilising the camera is the most convenient choice due to the automatic dimming rearview mirror and the substantially tinted back windows. Although it's simpler to utilise the camera & wing mirrors in low light, I still attempt to reverse park using my wing mirrors & the little vision from the back view mirror.

While seated in the front, it's not an issue; I must say, I don't like the black roof lining.
I don't know how my (adult) daughter will feel about the 340-mile trip to Mallaig in the back seat - I asked her opinion before I bought the car, and she said it was dark, but OK. She has since said it is very dark in the back, and she used to whine that she couldn't see much out of the windows in my Gen 2. She'll be seeing even less in the Gen 4!

I thought it was usual practise for self-dimming to turn off when the mode was switched to reverse. When the rear window is still heavily tinted, it doesn't assist much. Over-the-shoulder looks are almost useless in low light due to the vehicle's tinted back windows and rising belt line.

I've found that utilising mirrors and staring is sufficient for reversing in my Mazda 3, but that it all relies on the camera angle. The C3's door mirrors and camera are my go-to for rearward visibility since the mirror cuts off at shoulder level and at night, but the camera provides almost 180 degrees of vision all the way to the ground.

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